Dyslexia and You

My name is Naomi Smith. I have struggled with and overcome severe learning disabilities that resulted from medication in childhood. I faced many challenges and achieved many triumphs in dealing with dyslexia. At Arizona State University, I graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies and a Masters Degree in Curriculum Instruction for Early Childhood Education. To achieve this, I had to explore new ideas and be creative in overcoming my problems.

This website is dedicated to my younger sister who has encouraged me all throughout my educational success.

I provide helpful information and link to web sites from useful organizations. My website creates opportunities for students who struggle with learning disabilities.

We hope this information here helps you with new innovative learning alternatives so that you can have success on your journey in education.



Hello my name is Naomi. I was not born with dyslexia. When I was four years old I became very ill. One night my father was driving my family home from a nightly engagement. While getting me out of the car, he saw my eyes roll back in my head and rushed me to the hospital. I was unconscious and in a coma caused by measles. They gave me a drug to pull me out of the coma and this drug is what caused the dyslexia. This happened between 1970 and 1971. My mother told me all the children to whom the hospital gave this drug developed learning disabilities. The day I became dyslexic is the day my challenges began.

As an adult who suffers from severe dyslexia, looking back in my childhood, I can remember being in an inclusion class room from first grade to fifth grade. During this time I was integrated in regular classrooms for about a couple hours a day. During my academic program in the first five years I had the same teacher. Mrs. Howard. She really prepared me to do my best, to be successful, to be creative, to fight and never quit my education. She was able to bring my reading level to the sixth grade level. The barrier that I faced when I became a sixth-grader is that I was put into an inclusion classroom. This had no structure like my regular classroom.

There was very little education learning in my inclusive classroom. I listened to old 45 records and was teased profusely by my peers who were in regular classrooms. I wrote Mrs. Howard a letter stating that I did not want to be in the special education class any more. I told her what was going on in my special classrooms. I was not learning anything and I could not handle being teased any more. The learning material in my regular sixth-grade classroom was hard, but I told Mrs. Howard I could be successful in the regular classroom. I pleaded with her to help me convince my parents and the principal of the school, who was her husband, to put me in regular classroom. Within a month I was in a regular classroom. Since then I really had to fight hard to succeed in education. From my sixth-grade education to my college education I encountered teachers and professors who suggest that I quit school or college.

I made this web site with information which I gained through my education years. I believe the material will guide and encourage students and adults to be successful in their education and careers. Some of the information I came across by accident. For example, I went to a seminar that was provided by Disabilities Resource Center at Arizona State University. There was a doctor giving a seminar about mind mapping and meditation. I was so intrigued by the whole seminar that later in the week I e-mailed him to ask about mind mapping. Beginning with the seminar provided by Dr.Munn, I embarked on a journey that has not ended. I learned about focusing, calming your mind and body, having a positive attitude and believing in success. Dr. Munn came up with a learning strategy for a geology class that was extremely hard. He drew pictures of rocks and other terminology which help me to pass the course. Along with his wife, we are all very good friends.

I have encountered a lot of gracious people who helped me with my struggle in my undergraduate work and in the Masters program. Especially Jody and Marcia they both have always been there for me and help me to achieve whatever I was doing. My younger sister, to whom I dedicate this web site, gave me a lot of support when things looked especially bleak. Without her encouragement I do not believe I would have finished my education career. There are always problems that I face with my learning disability. However, if I have the faith and keep my determination there is nothing I cannot accomplish. I leave you with two quotes that I love and memorized. The first is from Winston Churchill. He said “Never… Never … Never… Never give up”. The last quote, from a sermon of Martin Luther King Jr’s father is, “Everyone can be great”. So, let us never give up and in so doing achieve greatness.


The first most important student with a learning disability should determine to never give up on their goals.

Helpful tips

Be on time for any lecture or exam.

Be organized (always have a schedule of your classes). Make sure all the exams, quizzes and homework are written down; go over it every day to make sure you are never late.

At the beginning of every class always introduce yourself to the professor or instructor. Let them know that you are a hard worker.  Some classes can be stumbling blocks and generally instructors may work with you to be successful.

Use liquid color highlighters when reading material

Color sticky pads

Color-code everything. (This is the helpful tool when reading or remembering a test)

Color layout sheets when reading  (http://www.dyslexia-test.com/color.html)

Tape recorder (Taping the lectures and going over it can reinforce the memory)

Always ask the professor or instructor before you tape their lectures.

Always have a note taker in the classroom if you are unable to take good notes.

If you are taking an exam and you need extra time, make sure you talk to the Disability Resources Center on your campus. This should be done at the beginning of each semester.

Types Of Test For Adult Dyslexics

An adult that is suspected to have dyslexia can take tests to know whether he or she is positive for the condition. If you think that you have dyslexia, then it is recommended that you take a test. There are basically two types of tests that you can get, namely screening and comprehensive.

Screening Tests

Screening tests are specially designed to narrow down the number of candidates for the condition. These are typically used in schools, in which a number of students take it and those who yield a positive result are identified to take a more thorough testing procedure.

These are not really specific tests for dyslexia. However, they are simply designed to help out researchers to identify and focus on students or individuals who appear to have difficulties in regards to their studies, and who may have a possible case of dyslexia.

Such kind of test can be taken both by adults and children. Some companies can give out a test like this to identify who among their employees are somewhat challenged, specifically in reading, writing and math.

Usually, a screening test is consisted of a small number of short questions, like: “Do you have difficulty with spelling?”, “Were you unenthusiastic to go to school?”, “Do you find following directions difficult or confusing?”, “Do you have troubles with math?”, and the likes.

A person that yields a positive through this test may be having problems due to a number of causes. Some of the possible reasons are: Attention Deficit (ADHD), emotional problems, dyspraxia, autism, delayed learning, and possibly dyslexia. Screening tests are not really considered as a valid test for dyslexia, but these can be very useful for researchers.

Comprehensive Tests

The second type of test is comprehensive tests. This kind of test for dyslexia takes a look at the person as a whole. It also examines and tries to find out the root cause of any kind of learning difficulty that you may be experiencing.

Taking a comprehensive test simply means that you would have to undergo thorough testing. ‘Thorough’ in the sense that you would have to go to the extent of having your brain tested. Here your brain is examined to know which of its parts are functioning, which ones are not, and which are interfering with your acquisition of normal learning.

Not only do you have to get your brain checked, but also have to take a number of aptitude tests. Initially, your reading, comprehension, and spelling skills are to be tested. They also get your Intelligence Quotient (IQ) by giving you intelligence tests. Additionally, you would also have to take visual tests, visual scanning tests, laterality tests, sequencing tests, reversal test and the likes.

These are just some of the general tests that are given when you get a comprehensive kind of testing. However, the number of tests given can still vary, depending on the institute or professional that is giving you a comprehensive assessment. So this means, some may give you more or less, than those tests mentioned above.

Usually, a psychologist is the one that administers a comprehensive test. After all the data are analyzed, all of the test results are compiled into one complete report. In the report, you can see the conclusions about your condition along with the evidences for them.

Reasons You Should Get An Assessment For Dyslexia

Dyslexia is a condition that you should not be afraid of. Additionally, it is something that you should not be ashamed of. In fact, a lot of dyslexic people are very much successful. Some of these people are Da Vinci, Einstein, Susan Hampshire and Jackie Stewart. They are just a few of the many dyslexics that are very successful in what they are specializing in.

These people are proof that as a person that is suspected to have dyslexia, you should not be afraid at all. Even though dyslexia is considered to be a learning difficulty, a lot of geniuses have risen from the condition. In fact, people with this problem tend to have a different kind of thinking and way of solving things, which most of the time appears to be their advantage to normal people.

Most of the time, dyslexic people appear to be very gifted in visually-based skills like sculpture, art, architecture, design, and engineering. They are also usually original, creative, and lateral thinkers. Being one, you can devise your own original, often extremely successful, if quite unusual, ways to problem-solving. Because most dyslexic people have to try hard in able to succeed, a lot of them usually develop qualities like determination and extreme attention to detail, to a notable degree.

Why Get An Assessment

Getting a formal assessment can be very helpful to you, especially if you are already in college or working. In this way you can know what the real reason is for all the difficulties that you are experiencing. Other than that, there are other advantages that assessment can bring about. Here are some of them.

The Need For Additional Guidance

Getting a formal assessment for this condition can reveal if you are in need of additional guidance or not. It can show whether you have to take some extra training or get some instructions from a professional. Sometimes, people with dyslexia have to undergo language therapy with a speech and language pathologist, to cope up with the skills that he or she is having difficulties with.

In fact, there are some difficulties that one can overcome as a dyslexic, provided that you undergo the right training for it. Thus, you can still get some improvement, if only you would allow for it to happen.


Dyslexia is a somewhat misleading condition. People who are not aware of it may think that they are simply being stupid or careless. That is why; you should get an assessment, so that you can get some clarification on the real reason why you have these difficulties. Getting to understand what dyslexia and its nature can be your very first step on battling with it.

Also, with this clarification, you can actively participate on developing appropriate strategies for your problem. You should understand that your condition can not change if you are not willing to act on it.

A Change Of Perspective

As said earlier, dyslexic people are usually thought of to be stupid. If you are a dyslexic, that maybe already be your outlook to your self. That is why getting an assessment can change your perspective on whatever difficulties that may come your way. You can also identify your areas of strength. In this way, your outlook on your problem can entirely change, since it would not be all negative, now that you know your strengths.

Programs For Adult Dyslexia: Audioblox 2000

The Audioblox 2000 is a program that is based on the premise that the main problem is not the physical disability of the learner. The main problem is said to be the method on how the message is delivered and the learner’s preparation for it. This is just another one of the many methods how you can cope with your dyslexia.

How It Works

This method concentrates by working on the learning process’ basic tasks. It is believed that in able for a person to learn effectively, the educator should observe a sequence in teaching.

Similar to scaffolding, one simple skill should be taught first, before teaching a more complicated one. Certain things should be known by the learner first, before he or she can learn other information. This “prerequisite” kind of system makes learning an organized system.

The main objective of this program is to put into practice and automate your needed skills that lie beneath reading, writing, spelling, math and the whole process of acquiring more knowledge on different subject matters.

Basically, Audiblox is comprised of a system of different cognitive exercises. These exercises are generally aimed for the development of your foundational learning skills. When you are trained in this kind of program, your foundational skills are developed. Additionally, they are automated.


One fundamental skill that you need in able to learn is the ability to concentrate. Concentration is one important key in learning, because without it, you can not really achieve anything. You cannot grasp ideas or concepts if you are easily distracted. Optimal learning requires full concentration, or else, nothing is learned.


Another needed skill is perception. This may be auditory, visual, and haptic. The way you perceive things would highly affect how you understand them and how you can use them appropriately with your everyday life.


Proprioception is yet another skill that you need. Discriminating, synthesizing, and analyzing by the use of foreground, background, size, form, color and position in space or time, is a skill that can be useful with your everyday life.


Memory should also be developed. Just think how can you remember what you are learning if you do not have any kind of memory. That is why all kinds of memory such as short term, long term, auditory and visual are considered to be invaluable. Most dyslexics have problems with short term memory. However, when they associate some words with other things such as colors, remembering becomes easier for them.

Decoding And Integration

Next is your ability to decode information. Additionally, you should be able to integrate this decoded information, so that you can synthesize your learning process. If you cannot decode information that is given to you, then acquisition of new information is hampered.

The ability to understand the concept of numbers is also important. Today’s world revolves around math. Understanding simple number concepts is your first stepping stone in using numbers for daily application such as the use of money.

Motor Skills

Lastly, you also need your fine and gross motor skills. Body coordination is needed to perform simple tasks such as walking and difficult tasks such as writing. Flipping a page of a book already requires you good fine motor skills. Just think how you can learn without being able to simply turn a book’s page!

Modern Technology And Adult Dyslexia

Modern technology has wonderfully developed through the years of intensive research and testing. The efforts of these researches have not come to waste since now the products are used to help people cope up with their disabilities and difficulties, whether acquired or natural.

Nowadays, you use a number of accessible devices that could practically help you with your difficulties. However, which specific device to use would highly depend on your condition’s nature and severity.

Devices For Spelling And Grammar

If spelling and grammar are your major problem areas, modern technology has something to offer you. There are now devices that have spell-checkers to correct your spelling, and grammar checkers for your grammar correction.

Additionally, most of the modern computers now also have these kinds of features, which can be invaluable to you. Such features work by showing you your spelling and grammar mistakes and by providing you with the correct form while giving you the option to change what you have already written.

Electronic Dictionaries

Electronic dictionaries are similar to conventional ones, only that they are somewhat easier to use and faster. This kind of device gives you word definitions, synonyms antonyms, and pronunciation.

This can also be helpful if you are learning a new language, since some can provide you translations too. Using one is pretty easy since all you have to do is type in the word and you can instantly see the vital information about the word.

Audio Machines

You can also use dictating machines to aid you with understanding what you are reading. Tape recorders are also useful, especially if you are studying and you’re finding it hard to follow what your teacher is saying. In this way you can listen to what you have recorded, even after class hours.

Audio-typing programs are also available. All you have to do is dictate the data that you want to be encoded, and your computer would automatically do the encoding.

Text to speech programs are somewhat similar, only that they work the other way around. Here you can hear the encoded data on your computer by clicking on a button that would let the computer speak out the data.


Even normal people benefit from this machine; for dyslexia that has numbers as the waterloo, a calculator is obviously of great help.

Memory telephones

Since short-term memory is a big problem for dyslexics, remembering phone numbers can already be a tedious task for you. So to save you from this endeavor, you can make us of memory telephones that have the feature of storing phone numbers and automatically dialing them.

Electronic Organizers

Time management, scheduling and organizing are some of the other problem areas that dyslexics face. That is why you can try using electronic organizers to help you with your schedule. These can be useful by reminding you about your appointments, deadlines and meetings. You can also use it to list down some tasks that you have to complete for the day.

Voice-activated Computers

Another great tool would be voice activated computers. Here there’s no need for typing of any sort of data. You can control the whole computer just by dictating your commands. You can also dictate any information that you want to be encoded in your computer’s word processing program. However, this kind of gadget can cost you a lot.

Issues On Adult Dyslexia Strategies: Holistic Reading

There are several programs and methods used in treating dyslexia. One of these is holistic reading. However, this method has undergone through a lot of research and testing, which led to the discovery of some issues against it.

Holistic Reading

A lot of experts believe that one main issue in field of dyslexia, is holistic reading. Because of holistic reading, a lot of people have come to be sight readers that have holistic reflex instead of phonetic readers that have a phonetic reflex.

A holistic reader is someone who perceives each word as if it’s a little picture. It is somewhat similar to the configuration of Chinese ideograph, where the reader would try to think what the word the symbol or character represents.

On the other hand, a phonetic reader is someone who associates letters to sounds. He or she would have to sound out each syllabic unit, which blends into one articulated word.

The Issue At Hand

The main concern here is that, failure to teach someone to read phonetically, but requiring him or her to memorize thousands of sight words isn’t really that helpful, since it can only produce educational dyslexia.

Sight words, by definition, are words that are learned without any reference to the sounds that the letters in the word stands for. Nowadays, a lot of publishers are selling books coupled with audio tapes so that, one can learn how to read using the sight method, even without the help of other people.

If this continues, the individual would only worsen his or her condition. A reading handicap is actually developed even more, without knowing it.

Experts have reached the conclusion that that when an inaccurate, subjective and ideographic teaching technique is imposed on a writing system that uses phonetic-alphabet and demands precise decoding, symbolic confusion is only created. Plus, frustration, cognitive conflict, and learning breakdown, also comes into play.

Knowing If You Are A Holistic Reader: The MWIA TEST

To know if you have become a holistic reader, you can try taking the MWIA test. This is a simple test that is used to measure the degree to which you have become a “subjective” reader.

This test was developed in North Carolina by Edward Miller, who is a former teacher and school administrator, back in the early 1990s. A lot of reading experts and school psychologists say that this method can help identify individuals that are schooled using the Holistic Reading method.

The MWIA test basically consists of two lists of words. The first list has words that are taken from the 220 most popular “sight words”; while the second list is taken from words in “Why Johnny Can’t Read” by Rudolph Flesch, which are phonetically-regular words used in the first-grade level.

The main difference is that the words found in the first list, although may include about two dozen or more multi-syllable or irregular words, will be very familiar to Holistic readers. However, surprisingly, those words found in the second list may not. A holistic reader does not only slow down while reading the second list, but also commits some mistakes.

On the other hand, a phonetic reader is able to read both of the lists equally good. In fact, the second list may be read faster than the first since the words are easier.

Is It Really Dyslexia?

Dyslexia is one of the many learning disabilities that have an effect on language, and the acquisition of new knowledge. However, if you suspect that you have this condition, you should get a formal assessment. This is because; dyslexia can be mistaken for other learning disabilities that are related with it.

Here are some of the general symptoms that you have dyslexia and some of the related conditions that can be mistaken for it.

It Is Dyslexia!

When you have dyslexia, you may generally have some difficulty with the use of oral language. If possible, ask your parents or some relatives present during your childhood, whether you were a late talker or not. If they say yes, then this can be one sign of dyslexia. However, it can still be some other condition such as language delay.

Another characteristic would be difficulty in pronouncing words. Also, you may find it hard to acquire new vocabulary and use appropriate grammar for your age now. Directions are often confusing for you too, along with discriminating the difference of “before vs. after”, “right vs. left”, etc.

As a child, learning the alphabet was tedious for you. Even now, memorizing nursery rhymes and songs seem to be hard, even if you’re already an adult. Understanding concepts and the relationships of things can be something you don’t enjoy much. Additionally, word retrieval or naming problems are sometimes experienced.

It is dyslexia if you have had obvious difficulty with reading, such as learning how to read back when you were young, and inability to identify or make rhyming words. You can also have difficulty in counting the number of syllables that a word has.

Your phonological awareness can be damaged too. You may have some hearing difficulties. Plus, manipulating sounds in words is sometimes pretty hard to do. A little problem with your auditory discrimination can also be present, where you find it difficult to distinguish specific sound within a word.

Dyslexia can also show some difficulty in remembering shapes and names of letters. More often, you reverse your letters when writing or reading. You also tend to omit small words when you read, and stumble on long words. Comprehending what you have just read can also be a problem.

Your written language is also affected by dyslexia. You can experience some trouble in putting your ideas on paper. You can also have lots of spelling mistakes, and have problems in proofreading your work.

It Is Something Else

Some of the other conditions that are related with dyslexia are dysgraphia, dyscalculia, ADD or ADHD, and dyspraxia. Some of these conditions have similar problems with dyslexia. However, they also have specific symptoms that delineate them from it.

Dysgraphia is basically difficulty with handwriting. Here you are unsure whether you are right or left handed. You also have very poor or slow handwriting. Copying can be difficult. Plus you fine motor skills are really in a bad condition.

Dyscalculia deals with extreme difficulty with math. Simple counting of objects is already hard. You can also reverse your numbers and have lots of calculation errors. Memorizing math facts are not one of your favorite things to do, along with copying math problems.

ADD or ADHD deals with difficulty on attention. You are very inattentive and easily distracted by things around you. You can also be impulsive and hyperactive at times.

Dyspraxia is basically difficulty in coordinating and planning body movements. This can affect both gross and fine motor skills. You can have some difficulty in coordinating your facial muscles, in which a simple smile can be hard to do.

Helping Adults With Dyslexia In The Workplace

Even though adult dyslexics are tremendously talented, they still have some problems that may need special attention, especially coming from their employers and colleagues.

Most likely, adults with this condition are defensive and secretive. They also write down inverted financial figures and phone numbers. A simple memo can take an hour of their time just to decipher.


However, even with the acceptance of the condition, most would still likely try to hide their illiteracy from their colleagues. They have their own subtle ways on manipulating other people to write and read for them, which is a skill that most dyslexics have developed during their school years.

In most cases, severe headaches are the result of putting much effort into trying to read with accuracy. There is a loss of productivity that is obvious to anyone, although it can be hard to estimate up to what extent.

Playing such kind of masquerade won’t do any good in the part of both employee and employer. That is why openness about the condition is needed so that the employer and employee with the condition can help out each other in able to achieve productivity and success.


A little give and take between the employer and employee is important. Both sides should cooperate with each other on how they can improve the working experience and product of the employee.

One example would be devising a way to make it easier for the dyslexic adult to read while in the workplace. Employers should take charge and initiate that they’d be giving support to their employee to make reading easier. Adapting the workplace is easy, as long as there is cooperation between the workers and employers.

Some Reading Techniques In The Workplace

One way to help out reading disabled people so that they can efficiently work is to give them instructions orally.  Dictating through an audio recorder or voice mail would also be helpful. Doing this can help save time and increase productivity since there is no more need for an hour long memo deciphering sessions.

Assigning someone to read things to them is okay. However, this can sometimes make the employee with the condition feel somewhat awkward. It would be better to provide a computer that has a voice synthesizer. The computer can easily be the one to read the memos for you employee.

Computers are of great help, since most dyslexics are good in using one. In fact, some people with this condition sometimes find it easier to read from screens than reading from paper. Additionally, they are able to compose presentable reports and letters by using the spell-checker feature of the computer.
On Writing

With regards to writing, avoid giving written tests that are similar to those given in school. Another is that if possible; avoid asking your dyslexic employee to fill in very complicated forms.

If your employee haven’t had remedial training, then he or she has a somewhat disadvantage. But there’s no need to be discouraged, since they have accurate and detailed memories.

What you can do is to question them orally. You can also assign someone to write down their answers while they dictate it. If you really have to give a written test, then you are obliged to give extra time for your employee to answer it.

Additionally, the test should be conducted in an environment that is distraction free.

How An Assessment For Dyslexia Changes Your Life

Having dyslexia can have a great effect on your life. It can also affect how people treat you and how they see you. If you and other people are not aware that you have dyslexia, then be ready for a big emotional crisis with your life. This is one reason why getting an assessment for dyslexia, no matter how old you already are, is important.

If you get a formal assessment for the problem, and results show that you are positive for having one, then expect a lot of lifestyle changes to happen with your life. How your outlook on yourself can change along with the outlook of other people around you. That is just one general point of how an assessment can change your life, and there is more to that.

Things Can Now Be Fair

Getting an assessment can make things fair now in your life. For example, examiners or your professors may give you a very low grade, due to your poor performance. But now, once you get an assessment, they can reconsider the marks that they give you and make it somewhat relative to your condition or diagnosed ability.

With dyslexia, what you learn from a course can seem to be less than what normal people do. However, it may only appear less when you are asked to write about it. There are times that you know the lesson and understand it but simply can’t put it into writing. If this is the case, your examiner will be able to rate you fairly and won’t think that you are simply not studying for the subject.

A Different Judgment

If you get a formal assessment, the judgment of other people regarding how you are fit to do a job or not can change. People such as potential employers or admission tutors are some of the people that need to know if you are a dyslexic or not. Since dyslexia can affect a number of functional areas in your life, performing a certain position or a job should be well though of and deliberated on.

Getting into a program, course or job that requires a lot of writing skills can be a problem, especially if this is your major problem area. However, your assessment does not only show your weaknesses, but also your strengths. If your particular strength is pointed out in your assessment, and potential employers see this, their decision can change too.

Support And Grants

Getting financial support and grants are another advantage of getting a formal assessment. There are some organizations, universities or employers that provide additional support to cover for your additional training, guidance or therapy. They can also pay for some learning equipments that you may need such as computers and digital or tape recorders.

Receiving support for this kind of things can be very helpful in a lot of ways, most especially if you are financially challenged. A lot of organizations, companies and institutions are now opening their doors to the disabled population, and this includes the dyslexic population. So there is no reason anymore for you to be afraid of being diagnosed of having the condition.

Extra Time

Getting a formal assessment can also reveal that you may need extra time for taking examinations. In cases of examinations, the extra time given would depend on your assessed skill. Of course, you should not use your being dyslexic as an excuse for personal advantages, or for malingering.

Everyday Techniques In Dealing With Dyslexia

As an adult with dyslexia, you are not excused in dealing with day to day tasks that you need to complete for your survival. Thus, practicing some ways on how to deal with the common problems caused by the condition can be very beneficial, one way or another.

Reading Aloud

Reading aloud can be very helpful, in a way that you get to identify your mistakes and monitor your speech. Using a tape recorder for this technique is often the way to do it.

In this technique, you read out aloud while recording on your recorder. Then, you play back what you have just recorded and listen if you can detect some mistakes.

Your recorder acts as your “spotter” for the reading mistakes that you commit.

Time Keeping

Keeping track of time, appointments and schedules can be one problem that a dyslexic can face. Making use of the 24 hour clock format is one way so that you wouldn’t be confused on whether the time is during the night or day.

Writing What You Can Remember

Sometimes, when you are reading something long, you can have a hard time comprehending what you have just read. One way to cope up with this is through writing down what you can remember from what you have just read. For example, for every page that you finish, you write down ideas on your notebook.

However, this condition may seem to be a long process, since you would have to write everything that is on your mind. Nonetheless, even though it generally takes some time, it is very helpful during the long run.

Light It Right

The lighting of your environment can be very crucial, especially when you have dyslexia. Many have found that reading under bright lighting tends to slow down their reading. This is why having the right kind of light is important. Some find comfort in reading under soft white light, or even completely dim lighting.

Get Your Thoughts Back

When you are taking in too much information, you have a harder time on understanding what you are trying to learn. Thus, if you feel that you are not being productive anymore due to too much information, then it is about time that you take a break.

You should get your thoughts back in line. You can do this by simply taking a long leisurely walk outside and getting some fresh air. You can also try going to a quiet place, where you can do some meditation.

Finger spelling

If you have bad spelling skills, using the finger spelling method can be helpful to you. It works by putting up a finger for each phoneme or sound that you hear within the word. This method enables you to “see” the sounds. It can also work out which sounds are missing.

Using A Keyboard

Some people with dyslexia find it easier if they are spelling words through the use of a keyboard. The keys can sometimes give a calming effect to some individuals, while writing by hand can just cause the opposite.

These are some of the random ways on how you can ease up the effects of dyslexia in your life. The said techniques are often subjective, and can be helpful or not, depending on your condition.

Assessment Choices For Adult Dyslexia

If you are planning to get an assessment for your suspected dyslexia, there are some choices that you must consider. Basically, you can get a formal dyslexia screening or assessment from a couple of professionals that are allowed to do so.

Assessment From An Educational Psychologist (EP)

Your first choice and probably the best would be to get an assessment from an educational psychologist. This kind of assessment is considered to be the most comprehensive. The thing is they cost more.

This kind of assessment, however, are the ones frequently required as standard of proof by Tribunals, Examination Boards, Local Education Authorities, Colleges and Universities; which is why getting one can be really worth it, even if it can cost you much.

Usually, you have to answer a questionnaire for important background information. This is then sent to the Educational Psychologist. Next, you have a vital talk with the EP. You would have to undergo some activities that would usually take 2-2 ½ hours. Then, the EP would give a brief discussion about your results.

Lastly, you will get a confidential full written report, coupled with recommendations. You can get the report more or less in 3 weeks time from your assessment date.

Specialist Teacher Assessment

This kind of assessment is also comprehensive but is not that widely accepted as proof of the condition than the psychologist assessment. The same procedure is usually conducted, as with getting an assessment from an EP.

They also conduct brief assessments, where you have to do some activities for about an hour or so. After you have completed the activities, the specialist teacher will briefly discuss the results with you. He or she would also make some recommendations.

Occupational Therapists (OT)

You can also get an initial assessment of dyslexia from an independent occupational therapist. The yielded results are usually written into an intervention program that is specially tailored for you. You can then arrange follow up treatments, if you have to do so.

Undergoing occupational therapy would address particular difficulties related to balance and co-ordination. Such difficulties can vary from large or gross movements like riding bicycles to small or fine movements such as penmanship. However, occupational therapy is sometimes considered to be more helpful in addressing dyspraxia, which is a related condition to dyslexia.

Speech and Language Therapy (SLT)

Lastly, you can choose to get an assessment from a Speech and Language Therapist. The therapist can also give you an initial assessment of your condition. Just as with getting an Occupational Therapy assessment, your yielded results will be written into an intervention program that is tailored for you. Then you can arrange for therapy and treatment sessions to start your intervention.

Speech and language therapy is considered to be one of the major intervention programs that people with dyslexia can have. The therapy mainly focuses on language problems, which is the main concern of the condition.

Here, the assessment results already identify what your weaknesses are. The therapist then, automatically devices an intervention program for you to cope up with these specific problems.

Usually, after you get an assessment from an EP or Specialist Teacher, they would recommend you to see a speech and language pathologist to undergo intervention. If they observe that you also have problems with movement, then they would also require you to see an Occupational Therapist.

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